PSRC debuts LUV, a new look at regional growth

The region is growing—in fact, we’ve added the equivalent of another Tacoma just since 2010.
[caption id="attachment_8653" align="alignleft" width="300"]Graphic of Land Use VIsion's regional growth projections Under the Land Use Vision scenario, metro cities like Seattle and Tacoma would take on the highest share of regional growth—potentially 37% of the region’s population gains between 2010 and 2040.[/caption]

PSRC’s mission is planning for growth, and there’s a new data tool to help the agency do that. It’s called Land Use Vision—though around the agency, we just call it LUV.

LUV projects the growth in jobs, people and households that individual cities and counties anticipate in their comprehensive plans, policies, and growth targets. PSRC consulted with planners in local cities and counties to build LUV.

It also reflects PSRC’s regional growth strategy, VISION 2040.

What does LUV say about where the growth might end up?

According to PSRC’s lead planner on LUV, Rebeccah Maskin, metro cities like Seattle and Tacoma would take on the highest share of the region’s growth—potentially 37% of the region’s population gains between 2010 and 2040.

Regional growth centers around central Puget Sound would also accommodate a lot of that growth.

Maskin says the LUV scenario shows 25% of the region’s population increase and 45% of its job growth going into centers between 2010 and 2040. Centers include places such as Redmond Overlake, Lynnwood, and Downtown Tacoma.

The share of people living in rural lands would drop slightly under LUV. In 2010, 14% resided in those areas (outside the Urban Growth Boundary). LUV allocates 12% of the region’s population to rural areas in 2040.

The growth assumptions in LUV will be used for models in PSRC’s update of the Transportation 2040 plan, VISION 2040, and other work.

PSRC also has two other tools for projecting future growth in the region: The Macroeconomic Forecast projects the total number of people, jobs and households in the region every year up to 2040. The Land Use Baseline is an alternative to the LUV, and reflecting current development trends to build forecasts for cities and counties to 2040.

Contact Rebeccah Maskin (rmaskin@psrc.org / 206-464-5833) for more about LUV.